RSS
 

0.9.4 Released

30 Oct

This release demonstrates some of our thinking on how to handle file tasks.  The scripting system is now ready to demo:

  • Script triggered on successful upload
  • Basic script scheduler
  • Script triggered by file system events (Windows, Linux and OS X)

dcScript has been enhanced a great deal: OnError processing, File Operations, Data Streaming, GUI debugger, plus support for script libraries. A variety of example scripts are available.

Among the impressive features emerging is Streaming OpenPGP.  dcScript supports an async streaming model that no existing PGP library can reasonably support, so we created our own PGP streaming. More details and screen casts to come on this all all the new features.

 
Comments Off

Posted in DivConq

 

Maven Builds and Repository

23 Oct

We are closing in on the 0.9.4 release of DivConq. In this release we added support for building the divconq libraries using POM files and “mvn install”.

Furthermore, we now have now DivConq (BETA-2) in Maven’s Central repository. This is essential for anyone trying to build Java extensions for DivConq. Many popular Java build tools, such as Maven and Gradle, require a Maven artifact when compiling. With the release of 0.9.4 all you’ll need to do is add this dependency to your build file (e.g. your POM).


<dependency>
<groupId>com.divconq</groupId>
<artifactId>divconq-core</artifactId>
<version>0.9.4</version>
</dependency>

If your development relies on the file system notifications you’ll also need to set the library path:

-Djava.library.path=[path to jNotify 0.94 native libs]

Our support of Maven’s Central Repository greatly simplifies the process of creating custom projects from the DivConq framework. We’ll post more on this topic in the coming months.

 
Comments Off

Posted in DivConq, Framework

 

A new direction DivConq File Transfer

06 Sep

In the summer of 2011 I (Andy) started posting about DivConq Framework, our own little open source project. In 2011 and 2012 the focus of the framework was a Java connector to MUMPS nosql database. In 2013 my focus shifted due to customer demands and now the DivConq Framework has evolved into a File Transfer Framework.

This change is not a surprise really, since Jonathan and my professional expertise is in the file transfer industry.

Although the product is fledgling at present we believe it presents something more than a “me too”. First off it is a open source which is rare in the Enterprise class file transfer portfolio. Second the design goal is to be best of breed. Third we plan to keep it as simple as possible.

We’ll be posting more about the new Managed File Transfer (MFT) product we plan to develop so check back. In the mean time enjoy the latest demo, source code and Wiki on GitHub.

DivConqMFT on GitHub

 
Comments Off

Posted in Cloud, DivConq, Elastic Architecture, Framework, Gateway

 

How to Walk from the Las Vegas Strip to the Airport

11 Aug

(or, “How to Walk from a Casino or Hotel on Las Vegas Avenue to McCarran International Airport”)

So you’re stuck with an afternoon flight out of Las Vegas and you don’t really want to go back to the convention?  I know the feeling.  In August 2014 I decided to hike from the Rio (where DEFCON 22 was held) to McCarron Airport, largely based on some TripAdvisor advice that no one should ever try this. and Michael’s Dorausch’s blog post about hiking to the Strip from the airport.

Temperature: 87 (10am) to 95 (1pm)
Weather: full sun, no wind
Distance: 3.8 miles (The Rio across Las Vegas Avenue to McCarran Airport)
Time: 3 hours (included one stop for breakfast, one long rest stop and one short water break)

Map_Walk_Las_Vegas_Strip_To_Airport_By_Jonathan_Lampe

Thankfully my convention was the kind that required nothing more than a change of underwear, T-shirts and sandals, so I packed light.  I carried everything I needed in a backpack and carried a water bottle and a Gatorade I chilled in the hotel fridge overnight.  I also wore a ballcap and a “disposable” white T-shirt I got from a vendor at the convention.  (As soon as I cooled down in the terminal, I took the shirt off, threw it away and changed into a clean and dry shirt.)

FIRST LEG: Rio to Paris (20-25 minutes, 1 mile)

My first leg was pretty easy.  The foot pathway along Flamingo Rd. from the Rio to the Strip is disgusting but navigable and I made it to Caesar’s Palace in about fifteen minutes.  Paris is basically located kitty-corner from Caesar’s Palace so I made a quick detour through the Bellagio, crossed a couple of bridges and popped out in front of the fountain show and Paris’s outdoor cafe: Mon Ami Gabi.  I had a great breakfast (tea and crepes) and explored the casino until I found the way to Bally’s.

IMG_20140807_162145_046
View (north Strip) out of my 15th floor room at the Rio.

SECOND LEG: Bally’s to Hard Rock Casino (30-35 minutes, 1.5 miles)

The second leg took me off the strip and had me wondering about the neighborhood, but there was enough haphazard development and life along the way to make me feel safe.  I went east down Flamingo, then south down Koval, then east down Harmon Avenue.  The Hard Rock Cafe was like an oasis and was a great place to cool down and relax.

IMG_20140810_114356_665
View of the “High Roller” ferris wheel on exit from Bally’s on Flamingo Avenue.

IMG_20140810_115354_997
View of Hard Rock Hotel from Koval Avenue.

IMG_20140810_115644_959
View of Paris from Koval Avenue.

IMG_20140810_115956_715
View of the High Roller from Harmon Avenue.  (Notice the retro “2007” signs for the failed “Las Ramblas” development.)

IMG_20140810_120347_421
View of Hard Rock across Harmon Avenue.  (Stay on the NORTH side of the street so you don’t have to cross like I did!)

IMG_20140810_120631_739
Look back (west) down Harmon Avenue.

IMG_20140810_120641_845
View of Paris and surrounding area just before entering Hard Rock Cafe.

Selfie_Hiking_From_Las_Vegas_Strip_To_Airport
Selfie at the Hard Rock Hotel.  (With gear, including “disposable” white T-shirt.)

IMG_20140810_122216_980
Def Leppard display at the Hard Rock Hotel.

FINAL LEG: Hard Rock Casino to McCarran Airport (25-30 minutes, 1.3 miles)

The final leg made me nervous because Google Maps didn’t have walking directions to the terminal and there were multiple advisories about heavy traffic online.  However, it really was a straight and easy shot (with marked crosswalks), and it came with the bonus of walking through a cactus garden and by a an interesting statue of a cowboy.  The trickiest part came when the pedestrian walkway diverted from the airport drive, but if you just follow the path you’ll come to an underpass where you can rest in the shade and drink some water (it didn’t appear to be anyone’s residence).  From there, you should ignore the crosswalks to the east (they all go to dead ends) and instead go WEST (toward the cactus garden).  From there all you need to do is follow the well-marked path to Terminal 1.

IMG_20140810_122956_716
View of center strip buildings as you make the turn onto Paradise Road.

IMG_20140810_123131_622
Signs for the airport tell you you’re on the right path.

IMG_20140810_123637_713
Close-up of the Luxor from near the airport.  (I like the “reflection” look better than matte black.)

IMG_20140810_123821_043
View of north strip from near the airport.

IMG_20140810_123840_959
Southwest jet flies overhead as it lands.

IMG_20140810_123956_008
A UNLV stadium is visble from the road (left side/east) just before you cross the road and enter the airport.

IMG_20140810_124535_703b
A Southwest jet passes in front of the Luxor as it lands.

IMG_20140810_124716_059
A cactus on the airport grounds.

IMG_20140810_125049_749
The sidewalk diverges from the road.

IMG_20140810_125334_608
After the fence ends, the path continues to the RIGHT.

IMG_20140810_125340_861
The shady overpass on your left. (Stop and drink some water, but do NOT use the pictured crosswalk.)

IMG_20140810_125710_768
Take THIS path! (Go right/west once you reach the overpass.)

IMG_20140810_125750_758
Now, take THIS path!  (It’s to the right of the gem sculptures.)

IMG_20140810_125909_588
Cactus garden, looking east from the path.

IMG_20140810_130025_985
Path to terminal through cactus garden.  (I said it was straight.)

IMG_20140810_130334_626
Almost there!  (View of tower and parking structure from statue park.)

IMG_20140810_130403_573
“Vaquero” by Luis Jiménez on the way to the terminal.

IMG_20140810_130759_204
Finally: Terminal 1!  (Sorry it’s fuzzy – my camera couldn’t figure out the focus here.)

Cautions and Disclaimers

  • I don’t think I’d try this at night.
  • Stay hydrated.
  • Walk or hike at your own risk.
  • Everyone who sees you may think you gambled until you were broke!  ;)
 
Comments Off

Posted in Diversions

 

Java accessing GT.M via call-ins

14 Feb

I just completed a proof of concept to access GT.M from within Java. Have a look at the readme at the project page:

https://github.com/Gadreel/javam

Something like this could make its way into DivConq. The primary issue right now is there is no obvious (to me) way to capture the console output from GT.M via call-ins. The appeal of this approach is that it could be much faster than using SSH when connecting to a database on the local system. The nodeJS people have a project (nodem) that shows a 40x throughput over TCPIP. DivConq might be able to handle heavy loads (such as an import program) better with a direct connection like this.

 
Comments Off

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Still busy

26 Nov

I know I am not posting enough – but I am still working on the Framework a little every week. Within a month or two I expect to have something to talk about. The web layer is coming along well – web services (rpc) are well supported and so are web pages (there is even an optional CMS module – CMS engine uses jQuery Mobile for UI and it is working well).

The dcScripting language has support for some file transfer activities too. Little drops of progress have been made here and there…

 
Comments Off

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Must Read on MUMPS NoSQL Database

12 Jul

I don’t typically just link to other people’s stuff in a post. But this PDF that Rob Tweed did is a must read:

http://www.mgateway.com/docs/universalNoSQL.pdf

“MUMPS has a pearl in its oyster called Global Persistent Variables.  These are an abstraction of the B-tree structures that are normally used by MUMPS to store large volumes of data.”

As for DivConq, my schedule has been busy but I may get a chance to slip out the next release in the coming weeks. The project is not forgotten.

 
Comments Off

Posted in DivConq, MUMPS, nosql

 

Quiet but Busy

30 Mar

I’ve been quiet lately, but my day to day projects have taken the framework forward in many areas. Although 0.5.0 is not yet ready, big parts of the future versions are coming together. Here is a status update:

Version 0.5.0 (in progress)

dcDB – add support for dcSimple – Put, Get, Delete, Query (no progress)

dcDB – improve dcTables indexing, consolidate schema globals, support table instances (provide multi-homed / multi-domain support to apps) (2/3 done)

Users/Groups – improve support in task context (mostly done)

Locale Formatting – add number and date formatting to Java and MUMPS (1/2 done)

TimeZones/Chronology – add timezone support to Java and MUMPS, basic hooks for Chronology (1/2 done for US zones)

Version 0.6.0 (in progress)

dcServiceBus – support local (same JVM) service calls and schema support (done)

dcWeb – support remote service bus calls over web sockets, provide a Java client to use the web sockets interface (done)

dcClaims – provide minimal claims services – for local server or local squad. (not started)

Version 0.7.0 (in progress)

dcWeb – add HTTP RPC support for remote service bus calls. add service description language. (1/2 done)

dcWeb – provide web app framework based on dcQoo. (2/3 done)

dcAdmin – first release of admin tool, supports dcDB query and schema review (not started)

Version 0.8.0 (in progress)

dcWeb – Improve support for web frameworks, both dcQoo and dcLight. (mostly there)

dcRepository – compile developer repository, support master/project repository (not started)

At some point I need to buckle down and complete 0.5.0, but so far my user base is pushing too hard :) At this rate I would expect to see a 0.9.0 release in Q3, depending on how involved I get in Common Transfer Protocol then maybe Q4 version 0.9.5 with CTP.

 
Comments Off

Posted in Uncategorized

 

Design Notes on RPC Calls

19 Mar

Detailed in the link below are DivConq’s plans for RPC support. These plans are incomplete (there are also service discovery and service schema features) however this does cover network layer neutrality and how everything from small messages to large file transfers may route through this new protocol called Common Transfer Protocol.

Download PDF:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/divconqframework/docs/ctp.pdf

Or view on SlideShare:

http://www.slideshare.net/etimeline/ctp-12079818

 
Comments Off

Posted in Uncategorized

 

More Stored Procedures and MUMPS

29 Feb

DivConq has just released an presentation delving into details of Stored Procedure development within DivConq Framework. This includes examples on how to pass data to a stored procedure and how to return data from a stored procedure. It further includes how to pass status or debugging messages from stored procedure, including message localization.

Download : Download PDF or View on SlideShare.

The presentation covers:
1) Schema for Stored Procedures
2) Parameter data structures
3) Return data structures
4) UPDATE data example

 
Comments Off

Posted in Uncategorized